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Br J Cancer. 2017 Oct 10;117(8):1246-1254. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.285. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Occupational solvent exposure and risk of glioma in the INTEROCC study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne 3004, Australia.
2
Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), Barcelona 08036, Spain.
3
Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona 08003, Spain.
4
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid 028020, Spain.
5
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1H 8M5, Canada.
6
Leeds Institute of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Medicine, Institute of Cancer &Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9LN, UK.
7
Environmental and Occupational Health program in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.
8
University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Montreal H2X OA9, Canada.
9
Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Johannes-Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz 55131, Germany.
10
Unité Mixte de Recherche Epidémiologique Transport Travail Environnement Université Lyon 1/IFSTTAR, Université de Lyon, Lyon 69675, France.
11
School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Disease Prevention, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1G 5Z3, Canada.
12
Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Wellington 6140, New Zealand.
13
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval H7V 1B7, Canada.
14
The Cancer &Radiation Epidemiology Unit, The Gertner Institute, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer 52620, Israel.
15
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 6997801, Israel.
16
German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120, Germany.
17
Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh EH14 4AP, UK.
18
Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Centre for Epidemiology, Division of Population Health, Health Services Research and Primary Care, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aetiology of glioma remains largely unknown. Occupational solvent exposure has been suggested as a putative cause of glioma, but past studies have been inconsistent. We examined the association between a range of solvents and glioma risk within the INTEROCC project, a study of brain tumours and occupational exposures based on data from seven national case-control studies conducted in the framework of the INTERPHONE study. We also investigated associations according to tumour grade.

METHODS:

Data from the seven countries were standardised and then combined into one aggregate data set. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated for adjusted models that included sex, age, country-region of residence and level of educational attainment. Exposures to any solvent or 11 specific solvents or subgroups were assessed using a modified version of the FINJEM job exposure matrix (JEM) specifically developed for the study, called INTEROCC-JEM.

RESULTS:

Analysis included 2000 glioma cases and 5565 controls. For glioma and ever/never exposure to any solvent, the OR was 0.91 (95% confidence interval: 0.74-1.11). All ORs were <1.0 for specific solvents/subgroups. There were no increases in risk according to high or low grade of tumour.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study show no consistent associations for any solvent exposures overall or by grade of tumour.

PMID:
28910824
PMCID:
PMC5674105
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2017.285
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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