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Semin Immunopathol. 2018 Jan;40(1):75-85. doi: 10.1007/s00281-017-0642-0. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Structural and functional diversity of collectins and ficolins and their relationship to disease.

Author information

1
MRC Centre for Transplantation, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, 5th Floor Tower Wing, Great Maze Pond, London, SE1 9RT, UK.
2
MRC Centre for Transplantation, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, 5th Floor Tower Wing, Great Maze Pond, London, SE1 9RT, UK. steven.sacks@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Pattern recognition molecules are sensors for the innate immune system and trigger a number of pathophysiological functions after interaction with the corresponding ligands on microorganisms or altered mammalian cells. Of those pattern recognition molecules used by the complement system, collagen-like lectins (collectins) are an important subcomponent. Whereas the best known of these collectins, mannose-binding lectin, largely occurs as a circulating protein following production by hepatocytes, the most recently described collectins exhibit strong local biosynthesis. This local production and release of soluble collectin molecules appear to serve local tissue functions at extravascular sites, including a developmental function. In this article, we focus on the characteristics of collectin-11 (CL-11 or CL-K1), whose ubiquitous expression and multiple activities likely reflect a wide biological relevance. Collectin-11 appears to behave as an acute phase protein whose production associated with metabolic and physical stress results in locally targeted inflammation and tissue cell death. Early results indicate the importance of fucosylated ligand marking the injured cells targeted by collectin-11, and we suggest that further characterisation of this and related ligands will lead to better understanding of pathophysiological significance and exploitation for clinical benefit.

KEYWORDS:

Collectin-11; Glycans; Innate immunity; Lectin pathway

PMID:
28894916
PMCID:
PMC5794833
DOI:
10.1007/s00281-017-0642-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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