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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Dec;258:462-468. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.045. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Perceptual abnormalities in clinical high risk youth and the role of trauma, cannabis use and anxiety.

Author information

1
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Long Island, NY, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
10
Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences and Psychology University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Francisco and SFVA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.
12
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: jmadding@ucalgary.ca.

Abstract

Recent research suggests that perceptual abnormalities are a group of diverse experiences, which have been associated with trauma, cannabis use, and anxiety. Of the attenuated psychotic symptoms that are present in youth at clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis, perceptual abnormalities tend to be one of the most frequently endorsed symptoms. However, very few studies have explored perceptual abnormalities and their relationships with the above environmental and affective factors in a CHR sample. Four hundred and forty-one CHR individuals who met criteria for attenuated psychotic symptom syndrome (APSS) determined by the Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk Syndromes (SIPS) were assessed on the content of their perceptual abnormalities, early traumatic experience, cannabis use and self-reported anxiety. Logistic regression analyses suggested that both simple auditory and simple visual perceptual abnormalities were more likely to be reported by CHR who had early traumatic experiences, who are current cannabis users, and who have higher levels of anxiety. Multiple regression analysis revealed that only trauma and anxiety were independent predictors of both simple auditory and simple visual perceptual abnormalities. It is possible that examining subtypes of perceptual abnormalities in CHR leads to an improved understanding of the prevalence of such symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Attenuated psychotic symptoms; Clinical high risk; Hallucinations; Perceptual abnormalities

PMID:
28886901
PMCID:
PMC5915322
[Available on 2018-12-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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