Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Rep. 2017 Aug 15;20(7):1513-1524. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.07.057.

Intestinal Dysbiosis and Biotin Deprivation Induce Alopecia through Overgrowth of Lactobacillus murinus in Mice.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Research Laboratory, Miyarisan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo 114-0016, Japan.
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
4
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Institute of Health Sciences, Ezaki Glico Co., Ltd., Nishiyodogawa, Osaka 555-8502, Japan.
5
Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Tsuruoka, Yamagata 997-0052, Japan.
6
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 227-8561, Japan.
7
Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 227-8561, Japan; Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan.
8
Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0004, Japan.
9
Department of Dermatology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Department of Dermatology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo 181-8611, Japan.
10
Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan; Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0004, Japan. Electronic address: takagast@z2.keio.jp.

Abstract

Metabolism by the gut microbiota affects host physiology beyond the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we find that antibiotic-induced dysbiosis, in particular, overgrowth of Lactobacillus murinus (L. murinus), impaired gut metabolic function and led to the development of alopecia. While deprivation of dietary biotin per se did not affect skin physiology, its simultaneous treatment with vancomycin resulted in hair loss in specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice. Vancomycin treatment induced the accumulation of L. murinus in the gut, which consumes residual biotin and depletes available biotin in the gut. Consistently, L. murinus induced alopecia when monocolonized in germ-free mice fed a biotin-deficient diet. Supplementation of biotin can reverse established alopecia symptoms in the SPF condition, indicating that L. murinus plays a central role in the induction of hair loss via a biotin-dependent manner. Collectively, our results indicate that luminal metabolic alterations associated with gut dysbiosis and dietary modifications can compromise skin physiology.

KEYWORDS:

Lactobacillus murinus; alopecia; biotin-deficiency; dysbiosis; gut microbiota; metabolome; microbiome

PMID:
28813664
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.07.057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center