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J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Apr;21(4):422-426. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.020. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

The fatigue of a full body resistance exercise session in trained men.

Author information

1
Human Performance Laboratory, School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Australia. Electronic address: p.marshall@westernsydney.edu.au.
2
Human Performance Laboratory, School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the fatigue and recovery for 48h following a full-body resistance exercise session in trained men.

DESIGN:

Experimental cross-sectional study.

METHODS:

Eight resistance trained men volunteered to participate (mean±SD; age 27.0±6.0 years, height 1.79±0.05m, weight 81.8±6.8kg, training experience 7.8±5.0 years). Fatigue and pain was measured before, after, 1h post, 24h and 48h post the full-body resistance exercise session, which was based on in-season models used in contact team sports (e.g. AFL, NRL). Other measures included maximal torque and rate of torque development, central motor output (quadriceps muscle activation, voluntary activation, H-reflexes), and muscle contractility (evoked twitch responses). Linear mixed-model ANOVA procedures were used for data analysis.

RESULTS:

Fatigue, soreness, and muscle pain did not return to pre-exercise levels until after 48h rest. Quadriceps maximal torque and muscle contractility were reduced from pre-exercise (p<0.01), and did not return to pre-exercise levels until 24h. Early rates of torque development and muscle activation were unchanged. The amplitude and slope of the normalized quadriceps H-reflex was higher immediately after exercise (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Full-body resistance exercise including multiple lower limb movements immediately reduced maximal torque, muscle contractility, and increased pain. While recovery of voluntary and evoked torque was complete within a day, 48h rest was required for fatigue and pain to return to baseline. Maximal voluntary effort may be compromised for lower-limb training (i.e. sprinting, jumping) prescribed in the 48h after the session.

KEYWORDS:

Fatigue; H-reflex; Pain; Voluntary activation

PMID:
28716692
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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