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Patient Educ Couns. 2017 Nov;100(11):2028-2034. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2017.06.029. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Healthcare teams as complex adaptive systems: Focus on interpersonal interaction.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, University Hospital - 6K3, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent, End-of-Life Care Research Group, VUB & Ghent University, Belgium. Electronic address: peter.pype@ugent.be.
2
Faculty of Arts (Sint Andries Campus), Sint Andriesstraat 2, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium. Electronic address: demi.krystallidou@kuleuven.be.
3
Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, University Hospital - 6K3, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: myriam.deveugele@ugent.be.
4
Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, University Hospital - 6K3, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: fientje.mertens@ugent.be.
5
Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy, University of Lucerne, Lucerne\and Swiss Paraplegic Research, Nottwil, Guido Zäch Strasse 4, 6207 Nottwil, Switzerland. Electronic address: sara.rubinelli@paraplegie.ch.
6
Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, University Hospital - 6K3, Ghent University-Artevelde University College, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: Ignaas.Devisch@ugent.be.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a tool to objectify the functioning of healthcare teams operating in the complexity zone, and to evaluate its usefulness in identifying areas for team quality improvement.

METHODS:

We distributed The Complex Adaptive Leadership (CAL™) Organisational Capability Questionnaire (OCQ) to all members of one palliative care team (n=15) and to palliative care physicians in Flanders, Belgium (n=15). Group discussions were held on feasibility aspects and on the low scoring topics. Data was analysed calculating descriptive statistics (sum score, mean and standard deviation). The one sample T-Test was used to detect differences within each group.

RESULTS:

Both groups of participants reached mean scores ranging from good to excellent. The one sample T test showed statistically significant differences between participants' sum scores within each group (p<0,001). Group discussion led to suggestions for quality improvement e.g. enhanced feedback strategies between team members.

CONCLUSION:

The questionnaire used in our study shows to be a feasible and useful instrument for the evaluation of the palliative care teams' day-to-day operations and to identify areas for quality improvement.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

The CAL™OCQ is a promising instrument to evaluate any healthcare team functioning. A group discussion on the questionnaire scores can serve as a starting point to identify targets for quality improvement initiatives.

KEYWORDS:

Complexity science; Interprofessional; Palliative care; Self-organisation; Teamwork

PMID:
28687278
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2017.06.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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