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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 Jul;25(7):1199-1205. doi: 10.1002/oby.21860.

Exercise's effect on mobility disability in older adults with and without obesity: The LIFE study randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Sticht Center on Aging, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
2
Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
3
Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.
4
Department of Health and Human Services and Institute of Gerontology, University of Michigan, Dearborn and Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
6
Department of Geriatrics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
7
Departments of Health Research & Policy and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
8
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
9
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, Institute on Aging, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.
10
Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Some data suggest that obesity blunts the benefits of exercise on mobility in older adults. This study tested the homogeneity of the effect of a physical activity intervention on major mobility disability (MMD) across baseline obesity classifications in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. LIFE randomized 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70 to 89 years to a moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) or health education program.

METHODS:

MMD, defined as the inability to walk 400 m, was determined over an average follow-up of 2.6 years. Participants were divided into four subgroups: (1) nonobese (BMI < 30 kg/m2 ; n = 437); (2) nonobese with high waist circumference (WC > 102 cm [men], > 88 cm [women]; n = 434); (3) class 1 obesity (30 kg/m2  ≤ BMI < 35 kg/m2 ; n = 430); and (4) class 2 + obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 ; n = 312). Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to test an obesity by intervention interaction.

RESULTS:

The PA intervention had the largest benefit in participants with class 2 + obesity (hazard ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.48, 0.98). However, there was no statistically significant difference in benefit across obesity categories.

CONCLUSIONS:

A structured PA program reduced the risk of MMD even in older adults with extreme obesity.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01072500.

PMID:
28653499
PMCID:
PMC5567861
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21860
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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