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Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Dec;35(12):1887-1891. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2017.06.028. Epub 2017 Jun 15.

How can lifeguards recover better? A cross-over study comparing resting, running, and foam rolling.

Author information

1
REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain.
2
REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain. Electronic address: aleperez@uvigo.es.
3
REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain; International Drowning Research Alliance-IDRA, Río de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
Faculty Padre Ossó, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
5
REMOSS Research Group, Lifesaving and Motor Skill, Faculty of Education and Sport Sciences, University of Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain; CLINURSID Research Group, Psychiatry, Radiology and Public Health Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Institute of Research of Santiago (IDIS), Spain; Faculty of Educational Sciences, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of active recovery in form of running or foam rolling on clearing blood lactate compared to remain sitting after a water rescue.

METHOD:

A quasi experimental cross-over design was used to test the effectiveness of two active recovery methods: foam rolling (FR) and running (RR), compared with passive recovery (PR) on the blood lactate clearance after performing a water rescue. Twelve lifeguards from Marín (Pontevedra) completed the study. The participants performed a 100-meter water rescue and a 25-minute recovery protocol.

RESULTS:

The post recovery lactate levels were significantly lower for foam rolling (4.4±1.5mmol/l, P=0.005, d=0.94) and running (4.9±2.3mmol/l, P=0.027, d=1.21) compared with resting (7.2±2.5mmol/l); there was no significant difference between foam rolling and running (P=1.000).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that surf lifesavers clear out blood lactate more efficient when performing an active recovery protocol. Foam rolling is an effective method of increasing the rate of blood lactate clearance. These two recovery methods are also adequate for surf lifeguards as they do not interfere with the surveillance aspect of their job.

KEYWORDS:

Drowning; Foam roller; Lifeguard; Recovery; Rescue

PMID:
28651888
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2017.06.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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