Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prog Retin Eye Res. 2017 Jul;59:131-157. doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2017.04.003. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

Lateral thinking - Interocular symmetry and asymmetry in neurovascular patterning, in health and disease.

Author information

1
Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK; Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: james.cameron@ed.ac.uk.
2
Scottish Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 5 Little France Drive, Edinburgh, EH16 4UU, UK; Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9HA, UK. Electronic address: roly.megaw@ed.ac.uk.
3
Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9HA, UK. Electronic address: andrewjtatham@gmail.com.
4
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: s.mcgrory@ed.ac.uk.
5
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK; VAMPIRE Project, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Queen's Medical Research Institute, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ, UK. Electronic address: t.j.macgillivray@ed.ac.uk.
6
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: fergus.doubal@ed.ac.uk.
7
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: joanna.wardlaw@ed.ac.uk.
8
VAMPIRE Project, Computer Vision and Image Processing Group, School of Science and Engineering, University of Dundee, Queen Mother Building, Dundee, DD1 4HN, UK. Electronic address: e.trucco@dundee.ac.uk.
9
Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK; Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: siddharthan.chandran@ed.ac.uk.
10
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4SB, UK; Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Chalmers Street, Edinburgh, EH3 9HA, UK. Electronic address: baljean.dhillon@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

No biological system or structure is likely to be perfectly symmetrical, or have identical right and left forms. This review explores the evidence for eye and visual pathway asymmetry, in health and in disease, and attempts to provide guidance for those studying the structure and function of the visual system, where recognition of symmetry or asymmetry may be essential. The principal question with regards to asymmetry is not 'are the eyes the same?', for some degree of asymmetry is pervasive, but 'when are they importantly different?'. Knowing if right and left eyes are 'importantly different' could have significant consequences for deciding whether right or left eyes are included in an analysis or for examining the association between a phenotype and ocular parameter. The presence of significant asymmetry would also have important implications for the design of normative databases of retinal and optic nerve metrics. In this review, we highlight not only the universal presence of asymmetry, but provide evidence that some elements of the visual system are inherently more asymmetric than others, pointing to the need for improved normative data to explain sources of asymmetry and their impact on determining associations with genetic, environmental or health-related factors and ultimately in clinical practice.

KEYWORDS:

Asymmetry; Interocular symmetry; Patterning; Retina; Retinal imaging; Retinal vasculature

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center