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Acad Pediatr. 2017 May - Jun;17(4):443-449. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.015. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

Quality of Primary Care for Children With Disabilities Enrolled in Medicaid.

Author information

1
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. Electronic address: alyna.chien@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass; Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research and Policy, Department of General Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, Mass.
3
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
4
Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
5
Division of General Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco Beinoff Children's Hospital, San Francisco, Calif; Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, San Francisco, Calif.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, Little Rock, Ark.
7
Division of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pa.
8
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
9
The Clinical Research Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.
10
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
11
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The quality of primary care delivered to Medicaid-insured children with disabilities (CWD) is unknown. We used the newly validated CWD algorithm (CWDA) to examine CWD prevalence among Medicaid enrollees 1 to 18 years old, primary care quality for CWD, and differences in primary care quality for CWD and non-CWD.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study using 2008 Medicaid Analytic eXtract claims data from 9 states, including children with at least 11 months of enrollment (N = 2,671,922 enrollees). We utilized CWDA to identify CWD and applied 12 validated or endorsed pediatric quality measures to assess preventive/screening, acute, and chronic disease care quality. We compared quality for CWD and non-CWD unmatched and matched on age, sex, and number of nondisabling chronic conditions and outpatient encounters.

RESULTS:

CWDA identified 5.3% (n = 141,384) of our study population as CWD. Care quality levels for CWD were below 50% on 8 of 12 quality measures (eg, adolescent well visits [44.9%], alcohol/drug treatment engagement [24.9%]). CWD care quality was significantly better than the general population of non-CWD by +0.9% to +15.6% on 9 measures, but significantly worse for 2 measures, chlamydia screening (-3.4%) and no emergency department visits for asthma (-5.0%; all P < .01 to .001). Differences in care quality between CWD and non-CWD were generally smaller or changed direction when CWD were compared to a general population or matched group of non-CWD.

CONCLUSIONS:

One in 20 Medicaid-insured children is CWD, and the quality of primary care delivered to CWD is suboptimal. Areas needing improvement include preventive/screening, acute care, and chronic disease management.

KEYWORDS:

Medicaid; children; disabilities; pediatrics; quality of care

PMID:
28286057
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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