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Elife. 2017 Jan 24;6. pii: e19157. doi: 10.7554/eLife.19157.

Motility precedes egress of malaria parasites from oocysts.

Author information

1
Integrative Parasitology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Heidelberg University Medical School, Heidelberg, Germany.

Abstract

Malaria is transmitted when an infected Anopheles mosquito deposits Plasmodium sporozoites in the skin during a bite. Sporozoites are formed within oocysts at the mosquito midgut wall and are released into the hemolymph, from where they invade the salivary glands and are subsequently transmitted to the vertebrate host. We found that a thrombospondin-repeat containing sporozoite-specific protein named thrombospondin-releated protein 1 (TRP1) is important for oocyst egress and salivary gland invasion, and hence for the transmission of malaria. We imaged the release of sporozoites from oocysts in situ, which was preceded by active motility. Parasites lacking TRP1 failed to migrate within oocysts and did not egress, suggesting that TRP1 is a vital component of the events that precede intra-oocyst motility and subsequently sporozoite egress and salivary gland invasion.

KEYWORDS:

Plasmodium berghei; TRAP; cell biology; infectious disease; invasion; microbiology; salivary gland; sporosome; sporozoite

PMID:
28115054
PMCID:
PMC5262382
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.19157
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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