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J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017 Jul;117(7):1049-1056. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2016.11.013. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

Breastfeeding in Infancy Is Associated with Body Mass Index in Adolescence: A Retrospective Cohort Study Comparing American Indians/Alaska Natives and Non-Hispanic Whites.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest obesity prevalence in the United States, but the influence of early childhood variables on body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m2) is not well understood. Previous studies have investigated the association between breastfeeding in infancy and offspring BMI, but rarely included American Indians and Alaska Natives.

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigated the association between breastfeeding in infancy and BMI in American Indians and Alaska Native and non-Hispanic white adolescents and young adults.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal analysis based on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (1994 to 2008).

PARTICIPANTS:

Adolescent respondents who self-identified as American Indians and Alaska Native or non-Hispanic white, and whose parents completed the parental questionnaire, reported their height and weight. The final sample included 655 American Indians and Alaska Native and 10,305 non-Hispanic white respondents.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

Generalized estimating equations were used to measure the mean differences, 95% CIs, and P values of the association between breastfeeding in infancy and offspring BMI in adolescence, stratifying by race, and adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic variables.

RESULTS:

The length of breastfeeding was inversely associated with BMI in both populations. American Indians and Alaska Natives that were breastfed for 6 to 12 months or for more than 12 months had a mean BMI of 2.69 (95% CI -3.46 to -1.92; P<0.01) and 1.54 (95% CI -2.75 to -0.33; P<0.05) units lower than those that were never breastfed. Non-Hispanic whites that were breastfed for 3 to 6 months, 6 to 12 months, or more than 12 months had a mean BMI of 0.71 (95% CI -0.93 to -0.50; P<0.01), 0.68 (95% CI -0.87 to -0.50; P<0.01), and 0.85 (95% CI -1.09 to -0.62; P<0.01) units lower than those that were never breastfed. The association between the length of breastfeeding and offspring BMI varied by race (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Breastfeeding in infancy is associated with lower mean BMI. Future research should investigate causal pathways and whether interventions promoting breastfeeding in American Indians and Alaska Natives can prevent increasing BMI.

KEYWORDS:

American Indian/Alaska Native; Body mass index; Breastfeeding; Health disparities; National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health

PMID:
28082060
PMCID:
PMC5586593
DOI:
10.1016/j.jand.2016.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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