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J Invest Dermatol. 2017 Mar;137(3):561-568. doi: 10.1016/j.jid.2016.10.033. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

Performing Skin Microbiome Research: A Method to the Madness.

Author information

1
Dermatology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: konghe@mail.nih.gov.
2
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Core Facility NGS/Microbiome, ZIEL Institute for Food and Health, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.
4
Institute of Medical Biology, A*STAR, Singapore.
5
Biosystems and Biomaterials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA.
6
Translational and Functional Genomics Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
7
Institute of Environmental Medicine, UNIKA-T, Technical University of Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Augsburg, Germany; Christine Kühne Center for Allergy Research and Education, Davos, Switzerland.

Abstract

Growing interest in microbial contributions to human health and disease has increasingly led investigators to examine the microbiome in both healthy skin and cutaneous disorders, including acne, psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis. The need for common language, effective study design, and validated methods is critical for high-quality standardized research. Features, unique to skin, pose particular challenges when conducting microbiome research. This review discusses microbiome research standards and highlights important factors to consider, including clinical study design, skin sampling, sample processing, DNA sequencing, control inclusion, and data analysis.

PMID:
28063650
PMCID:
PMC5468751
DOI:
10.1016/j.jid.2016.10.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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