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Schizophr Res. 2017 Jul;185:167-172. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2016.11.032. Epub 2016 Nov 29.

Psychological well-being and mental health recovery in the NIMH RAISE early treatment program.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: jbrowne@unc.edu.
2
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Australian Catholic University, School of Psychology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
3
Minnesota Center for Chemical and Mental Health, University of Minnesota School of Social Work, St. Paul, MN, USA.
4
Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Departments of Occupational Therapy, Psychology, & Psychiatry, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
6
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, USA; Bureau of Behavioral Health, DHHS, Concord, NH, USA.
7
The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry Research, North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hempstead, NY, USA; The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Bronx, NY, USA.
8
Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY, USA.
9
Yale Medical School, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT, USA.
10
The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry Research, North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
11
The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry Research, North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, NY, USA; Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine, Hempstead, NY, USA; The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.
12
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
13
The Zucker Hillside Hospital, Psychiatry Research, North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, NY, USA.

Abstract

Recovery-oriented practices that promote client-centered care, collaboration, and functional outcome have been recommended to improve treatment engagement, especially for individuals with serious mental illness (SMI). Psychological well-being (PWB) is related to recovery and refers to experiencing purpose and meaning in life through realizing one's potential. The recently completed Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode Early Treatment Program (RAISE ETP) study sought to improve quality of life, functional outcome, and well-being in individuals with first episode psychosis (FEP). Therefore, the primary aims of the present analysis were: 1) to examine the impact of treatment on PWB and mental health recovery trajectories, 2) to examine the impact of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) on these outcomes, and 3) to examine the relationships among these outcomes and quality of life. Multilevel modeling was used given the nested data structure. Results revealed that PWB and mental health recovery improved over the course of the 2-year treatment; there were no significant treatment differences. In addition, DUP was associated with the Positive Relationships and Environmental Mastery dimensions of PWB. Finally, PWB, mental health recovery, and quality of life were all significantly correlated at baseline while controlling for depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings indicate that PWB and mental health recovery can improve in FEP, are related to yet distinct from quality of life, and that DUP may play a role in certain facets of these constructs.

KEYWORDS:

Coordinated specialty care; First episode psychosis; Psychological well-being

PMID:
27913160
PMCID:
PMC5612365
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2016.11.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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