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Development. 2016 Oct 15;143(20):3711-3722.

A YY1-dependent increase in aerobic metabolism is indispensable for intestinal organogenesis.

Author information

1
Rutgers University, Department of Genetics, Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey (HGINJ), 145 Bevier Road, Piscataway Township, NJ 08854, USA.
2
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey (CINJ), 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.
3
Cell and Developmental Biology Department, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
4
Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, NJ 07102, USA.
6
Rutgers University, Department of Genetics, Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey (HGINJ), 145 Bevier Road, Piscataway Township, NJ 08854, USA verzi@biology.rutgers.edu.

Abstract

During late gestation, villi extend into the intestinal lumen to dramatically increase the surface area of the intestinal epithelium, preparing the gut for the neonatal diet. Incomplete development of the intestine is the most common gastrointestinal complication in neonates, but the causes are unclear. We provide evidence in mice that Yin Yang 1 (Yy1) is crucial for intestinal villus development. YY1 loss in the developing endoderm had no apparent consequences until late gestation, after which the intestine differentiated poorly and exhibited severely stunted villi. Transcriptome analysis revealed that YY1 is required for mitochondrial gene expression, and ultrastructural analysis confirmed compromised mitochondrial integrity in the mutant intestine. We found increased oxidative phosphorylation gene expression at the onset of villus elongation, suggesting that aerobic respiration might function as a regulator of villus growth. Mitochondrial inhibitors blocked villus growth in a fashion similar to Yy1 loss, thus further linking oxidative phosphorylation with late-gestation intestinal development. Interestingly, we find that necrotizing enterocolitis patients also exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes. Our study highlights the still unappreciated role of metabolic regulation during organogenesis, and suggests that it might contribute to neonatal gastrointestinal disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Intestinal maturation; Intestinal organogenesis; Mouse; Necrotizing enterocolitis; Oxidative phosphorylation; Villus; YY1

PMID:
27802136
PMCID:
PMC5087649
DOI:
10.1242/dev.137992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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