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BMC Public Health. 2016 Oct 21;16(1):1105.

E-cigarette use and smoking reduction or cessation in the 2010/2011 TUS-CPS longitudinal cohort.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Moores UC San Diego Cancer Center, 3855 Health Sciences Drive #0901, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0901, USA.
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0628, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0628, USA.
3
Division of General Internal Medicine/San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, 1545 Divisadero St, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA.
4
National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9589, USA.
5
Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9761, USA.
6
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Moores UC San Diego Cancer Center, 3855 Health Sciences Drive #0901, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0901, USA. kmesser@ucsd.edu.
7
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #0628, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0628, USA. kmesser@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are heavily marketed and widely perceived as helpful for quitting or reducing smoking intensity. We test whether ever-use of e-cigarettes among early adopters was associated with: 1) increased cigarette smoking cessation; and 2) reduced cigarette consumption.

METHODS:

A representative cohort of U.S. smokers (N = 2454) from the 2010 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) was re-interviewed 1 year later. Outcomes were smoking cessation for 30+ days and change in cigarette consumption at follow-up. E-cigarettes use was categorized as for cessation purposes or for another reason. Multivariate regression was used to adjust for demographics and baseline cigarette dependence level.

RESULTS:

In 2011, an estimated 12 % of adult U.S. smokers had ever used e-cigarettes, and 41 % of these reported use to help quit smoking. Smokers who had used e-cigarettes for cessation were less likely to be quit for 30+ days at follow-up, compared to never-users who tried to quit (11.1 % vs 21.6 %; ORadj = 0.44, 95 % CI = 0.2-0.8). Among heavier smokers at baseline (15+ cigarettes per day (CPD)), ever-use of e-cigarettes was not associated with change in smoking consumption. Lighter smokers (<15 CPD) who had ever used e-cigarettes for quitting had stable consumption, while increased consumption was observed among all other lighter smokers, although this difference was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among early adopters, ever-use of first generation e-cigarettes to aid quitting cigarette smoking was not associated with improved cessation or with reduced consumption, even among heavier smokers.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarettes; Smoking cessation; Smoking reduction

PMID:
27769302
PMCID:
PMC5073733
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-016-3770-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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