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Environ Health. 2016 Oct 21;15(1):100.

Occupation, industry, and the risk of prostate cancer: a case-control study in Montréal, Canada.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Department of environmental and occupational health, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3J7, Canada.
2
Centre de recherche du CHUM, 850 rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec, H2X 0A9, Canada.
3
Centre de recherche du CHUM, 850 rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec, H2X 0A9, Canada. marie-elise.parent@iaf.inrs.ca.
4
Epidemiology and Biostatistics UnitEpidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Université du Québec, 531 Boul. des Prairies, Laval, Québec, H7V 1B7, Canada. marie-elise.parent@iaf.inrs.ca.
5
School of Public Health, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3J7, Canada. marie-elise.parent@iaf.inrs.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Age, family history and ancestry are the only recognized risk factors for prostate cancer (PCa) but a role for environmental factors is suspected. Due to the lack of knowledge on the etiological factors for PCa, studies that are both hypothesis-generating and confirmatory are still needed. This study explores relationships between employment, by occupation and industry, and PCa risk.

METHODS:

Cases were 1937 men aged ≤75 years with incident PCa diagnosed across Montreal French hospitals in 2005-2009. Controls were 1994 men recruited concurrently from electoral lists of French-speaking Montreal residents, frequency-matched to cases by age. In-person interviews elicited occupational histories. Unconditional logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for the association between employment across 696 occupations and 613 industries and PCa risk, adjusting for potential confounders. Multinomial logistic models assessed risks by PCa grade. Semi-Bayes (SB) adjustment accounted for the large number of associations evaluated.

RESULTS:

Consistently positive associations-and generally robust to SB adjustment-were found for occupations in forestry and logging (OR 1.9, 95 % CI: 1.2-3.0), social sciences (OR 1.6, 95 % CI: 1.1-2.2) and for police officers and detectives (OR: 1.8, 95 % CI 1.1-2.9). Occupations where elevated risk of high grade PCa was found included gasoline station attendants (OR 4.3, 95 % CI 1.8-10.4) and textile processing occupations (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.1-3.2). Aside from logging, industries with elevated PCa risk included provincial government and financial institutions. Occupations with reduced risk included farmers (OR 0.6, 95 % CI 0.4-1.0) and aircraft maintenance workers (OR 0.1, 95 % CI 0.0-0.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Excess PCa risks were observed across several occupations, including predominantly white collar workers. Further analyses will focus on specific occupational exposures.

KEYWORDS:

Industry; Occupation; Prostate cancer

PMID:
27769264
PMCID:
PMC5073998
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-016-0185-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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