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Science. 2016 Oct 14;354(6309):237-240. Epub 2016 Sep 22.

Rapid development of a DNA vaccine for Zika virus.

Author information

1
Viral Pathogenesis Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
2
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
3
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE (Instituto Alberto Luiz Coimbra de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa de Engenharia), Chemical Engineering Program, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
4
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
5
Structural Informatics Unit, Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
6
Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Cancer Research Technology Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.
7
Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.
8
Bioqual, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.
9
Translational Medicine Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.
10
Viral Diseases Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.
11
Biostatistics Research Branch, Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20852, USA.
12
Viral Pathogenesis Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. piersontc@niaid.nih.gov bgraham@mail.nih.gov.
13
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. piersontc@niaid.nih.gov bgraham@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) was identified as a cause of congenital disease during the explosive outbreak in the Americas and Caribbean that began in 2015. Because of the ongoing fetal risk from endemic disease and travel-related exposures, a vaccine to prevent viremia in women of childbearing age and their partners is imperative. We found that vaccination with DNA expressing the premembrane and envelope proteins of ZIKV was immunogenic in mice and nonhuman primates, and protection against viremia after ZIKV challenge correlated with serum neutralizing activity. These data not only indicate that DNA vaccination could be a successful approach to protect against ZIKV infection, but also suggest a protective threshold of vaccine-induced neutralizing activity that prevents viremia after acute infection.

PMID:
27708058
PMCID:
PMC5304212
DOI:
10.1126/science.aai9137
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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