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Reprod Toxicol. 2016 Oct;65:307-320. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2016.08.018. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

Metabolic targets of endocrine disrupting chemicals assessed by cord blood transcriptome profiling.

Author information

1
Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610, Wilrijk, Belgium; Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400, Mol, Belgium. Electronic address: sylvie.remy@uantwerpen.be.
2
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400, Mol, Belgium.
3
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400, Mol, Belgium; Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan gebouw D, 3590, Diepenbeek, Belgium.
4
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400, Mol, Belgium; Directorate of Public Health and Surveillance, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Juliette Wytsmanstraat 14, 1050, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Department of Analytical, Environmental and Geochemistry (AEGC), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels, Belgium.
6
Department of Public Health, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 33, 9000, Ghent, Belgium; FWO Research Foundation, Egmontstraat 5, 1000, Brussels, Belgium.
7
Department of Analytical, Environmental and Geochemistry (AEGC), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Radiotherapy and Experimental cancer research, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 33, 9000, Ghent, Belgium.
8
EKZ-AMC, University of Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Toxicological Center, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610, Wilrijk, Belgium.
10
Institute for Occupational and Social Medicine, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, PauwelsstraƟe 30, 52074, Aachen, Germany.
11
Department of Health, Provincial Institute for Hygiene, Kronenburgstraat 45, 2000, Antwerp, Belgium.
12
Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
13
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400, Mol, Belgium; Biomedical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610, Wilrijk, Belgium; Environmental Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Campusvej 55, 5000, Odense, Denmark.

Abstract

Early life exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been frequently associated with impaired perinatal growth, an important risk factor for later onset of metabolic disorders. We analyzed whether the cord blood transcriptome showed early indications of alterations in metabolic processes in 195 human samples in relation to cord blood levels of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), polychlorinated biphenyl-153 (PCB-153), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Overall, 39 metabolically relevant transcription factors were significantly enriched (31 by p,p'-DDE, 10 by PCB-153, 8 by PFOA, and 2 by PFOS). These included the glucocorticoid receptor (p,p'-DDE and PCB-153) and the progesterone receptor (PFOA and PFOS). The 'insulin receptor signaling', 'acute phase response signaling', 'Interleukin(IL)-6 signaling', and 'prolactin signaling' pathways were significantly enriched in relation to p,p'-DDE. Transcriptional changes at birth suggest a role for specific metabolic targets as a link between prenatal EDC exposure and metabolic disorders later in life.

KEYWORDS:

Birth cohort; Cord blood; Endocrine disrupting chemicals; Glucocorticoid receptor; Metabolic disorders; Transcriptomics

PMID:
27589886
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2016.08.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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