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Inflammation. 2016 Oct;39(5):1729-36. doi: 10.1007/s10753-016-0407-2.

Parallel Profiles of Inflammatory and Effector Memory T Cells in Visceral Fat and Liver of Obesity-Associated Cancer Patients.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, St James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland.
2
School of Biological Sciences, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland.
3
Oesophageal Unit, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
4
Department of Surgery, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, St James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. jlysaght@tcd.ie.

Abstract

In the midst of a worsening obesity epidemic, the incidence of obesity-associated morbidities, including cancer, diabetes, cardiac and liver disease is increasing. Insights into mechanisms underlying pathological obesity-associated inflammation are lacking. Both the omentum, the principal component of visceral fat, and liver of obese individuals are sites of excessive inflammation, but to date the T cell profiles of both compartments have not been assessed or compared in a patient cohort with obesity-associated disease. We have previously identified that omentum is enriched with inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and T cells. Here, we compared the inflammatory profile of T cells in the omentum and liver of patients with the obesity-associated malignancy oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Furthermore, we assessed the secreted cytokine profile in OAC patient serum, omentum and liver to assess systemic and local inflammation. We observed parallel T cell cytokine profiles and phenotypes in the omentum and liver of OAC patients, in particular CD69(+) and inflammatory effector memory T cells. This study reflects similar processes of inflammation and T cell activation in the omentum and liver, and may suggest common targets to modulate pathological inflammation at these sites.

KEYWORDS:

T cells; cancer; inflammation; liver; obesity; omentum

PMID:
27423204
DOI:
10.1007/s10753-016-0407-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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