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BMC Cancer. 2016 Jul 7;16:395. doi: 10.1186/s12885-016-2432-9.

Occupational prestige, social mobility and the association with lung cancer in men.

Author information

1
Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance (IPA), Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany. behrens@ipa-dguv.de.
2
Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance (IPA), Institute of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bürkle-de-la-Camp-Platz 1, 44789, Bochum, Germany.
3
Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) and School of Public Health, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
4
Dental School, College of Medicine Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G2 3JZ, UK.
5
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
6
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer Team, F-94807, Villejuif, France.
8
University Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94807, Villejuif, France.
9
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
10
Leibniz-Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology -BIPS GmbH, Bremen, Germany.
11
Institute for Statistics, University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
12
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg, Germany.
13
Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany.
14
Unit of Epidemiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
15
Department of Medical Sciences, Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
16
Department of Molecular Medicine, Laboratory of Public Health and Population Studies, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
17
Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata, Rome, Italy.
18
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval, Québec, Canada.
19
Cancer Care Ontario, Occupational Cancer Research Centre, Toronto, Canada.
20
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, USA.
21
Institute of Carcinogenesis, Russian Cancer Research Centre, Moscow, Russia.
22
The Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
23
National Centre for Public Health, Budapest, Hungary.
24
The M Sklodowska-Curie Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland.
25
Regional Authority of Public Health, Preventive Occupational Medicine, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia.
26
Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer Unit, University of Oviedo-Ciber de Epidemiologia, CIBERESP, Oviedo, Spain.
27
Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme, The University of Liverpool Cancer Research Centre, Liverpool, UK.
28
Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
29
National Institute of Public Health, Bucharest, Romania.
30
Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
31
Department of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty of Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
32
Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
33
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.
34
Environmental Epidemiology Division, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
35
The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The nature of the association between occupational social prestige, social mobility, and risk of lung cancer remains uncertain. Using data from the international pooled SYNERGY case-control study, we studied the association between lung cancer and the level of time-weighted average occupational social prestige as well as its lifetime trajectory.

METHODS:

We included 11,433 male cases and 14,147 male control subjects. Each job was translated into an occupational social prestige score by applying Treiman's Standard International Occupational Prestige Scale (SIOPS). SIOPS scores were categorized as low, medium, and high prestige (reference). We calculated odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for study center, age, smoking, ever employment in a job with known lung carcinogen exposure, and education. Trajectories in SIOPS categories from first to last and first to longest job were defined as consistent, downward, or upward. We conducted several subgroup and sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of our results.

RESULTS:

We observed increased lung cancer risk estimates for men with medium (OR = 1.23; 95 % CI 1.13-1.33) and low occupational prestige (OR = 1.44; 95 % CI 1.32-1.57). Although adjustment for smoking and education reduced the associations between occupational prestige and lung cancer, they did not explain the association entirely. Traditional occupational exposures reduced the associations only slightly. We observed small associations with downward prestige trajectories, with ORs of 1.13, 95 % CI 0.88-1.46 for high to low, and 1.24; 95 % CI 1.08-1.41 for medium to low trajectories.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results indicate that occupational prestige is independently associated with lung cancer among men.

KEYWORDS:

Life course; Occupational history; SYNERGY; Social prestige; Socio-economic status; Transitions

PMID:
27388894
PMCID:
PMC4936282
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-016-2432-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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