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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016 Apr 29;10(4):e0004581. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004581. eCollection 2016 Apr.

A Deep Insight into the Sialome of Rhodnius neglectus, a Vector of Chagas Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, The University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.
2
Vector Biology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America.
3
Ceilândia Faculty, The University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.
4
Department of Parasitology, The University of Goiás, Jataí, Brazil.
5
Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane - Fiocruz Amazônia, Manaus, Brazil.
6
Department of Computer Science, The University of Brasília, Brasília, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Triatomines are hematophagous insects that act as vectors of Chagas disease. Rhodnius neglectus is one of these kissing bugs found, contributing to the transmission of this American trypanosomiasis. The saliva of hematophagous arthropods contains bioactive molecules responsible for counteracting host haemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.

METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Next generation sequencing and mass spectrometry-based protein identification were performed to investigate the content of triatomine R. neglectus saliva. We deposited 4,230 coding DNA sequences (CDS) in GenBank. A set of 636 CDS of proteins of putative secretory nature was extracted from the assembled reads, 73 of them confirmed by proteomic analysis. The sialome of R. neglectus was characterized and serine protease transcripts detected. The presence of ubiquitous protein families was revealed, including lipocalins, serine protease inhibitors, and antigen-5. Metalloproteases, disintegrins, and odorant binding protein families were less abundant.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

The data presented improve our understanding of hematophagous arthropod sialomes, and aid in understanding hematophagy and the complex interplay among vectors and their vertebrate hosts.

PMID:
27129103
PMCID:
PMC4851354
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0004581
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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