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J Voice. 2017 Jan;31(1):104-106. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.01.008. Epub 2016 Apr 8.

Gardasil Vaccination for Recurrent Laryngeal Papillomatosis in Adult Men: First Report: Changes in HPV Antibody Titer.

Author information

  • 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nihon University Hospital, 1-6 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8309, Japan.. Electronic address: mak@med.email.ne.jp.
  • 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nihon University Hospital, 1-6 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8309, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA-positive recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis commonly have repeated recurrences following surgery. The reason is suspected to be a mechanism by which latent HPV infection in the surrounding healthy mucosa reinfects the surgical site. It may be that production of HPV antibodies in the laryngeal mucosa with Gardasil injection could inhibit postoperative recurrence.

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a case series study.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to examine whether Gardasil injection effectively inhibits recurrence. However, as a first report, we describe the antibody titers before and after vaccination.

METHODS:

Gardasil was injected in 12 men (aged 32-74 years; mean age 47.9 years) with HPV-positive laryngeal papillomatosis. Serum antibody titers of HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 were measured by a competitive Luminex-based immunoassay before the vaccination and 7 months after the start of the vaccination.

RESULTS:

Each of the antibody titers was very low before vaccination, and they rose in all patients after the vaccination.

CONCLUSIONS:

This finding demonstrates that antibody titers increase with Gardasil injection in post-adolescent males.

KEYWORDS:

Gardasil; antibody titers; quadrivalent HPV vaccine; recurrent laryngeal papilloma; recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

PMID:
27068425
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvoice.2016.01.008
[PubMed - in process]
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