Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatrics. 2016 Apr;137(4). pii: e20153766. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-3766. Epub 2016 Mar 14.

Home-Based Early Intervention and the Influence of Family Resources on Cognitive Development.

Author information

1
Division of Statistical and Data Sciences, and cmb@rti.org.
2
Psychological Sciences and Health Sciences Research Institute, University of California, Merced, California;
3
Biostatistics and Epidemiology, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina;
4
Departments of Community Health Sciences and Family Medicine, Aga Khan University Medical College, Karachi, Pakistan;
5
Sparks Clinics and Department of Psychology, and.
6
Department of Pediatrics, and.
7
Department of Medical Education, KLE Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, India; and.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama;

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether early developmental intervention (EDI) can positively affect the trajectories of cognitive development among children from low-resource families.

METHODS:

Longitudinal analyses were conducted of data from 293 children in the Brain Research to Ameliorate Impaired Neurodevelopment Home-based Intervention Trial, a randomized controlled trial of a home-based EDI program, to examine trajectories of Bayley Scales of Infant Development-Second Edition Mental Development Index (MDI) scores from 12 to 36 months of age among young children from high- and low-resource families in 3 low- to middle-resource countries.

RESULTS:

A 3-way interaction among family resources, intervention group, and age was statistically significant after controlling for maternal, child, and birth characteristics (Wald χ(2)(1) = 9.41, P = .002). Among children of families with high resources, both the intervention and control groups had significant increases in MDI scores over time (P < .001 and P = .002, respectively), and 36-month MDI scores for these 2 groups did not differ significantly (P = .602). However, in families with low resources, the EDI group displayed greater improvement, resulting in significantly higher 36-month MDI scores than the control group (P < .001). In addition, the 36-month MDI scores for children in families with low resources receiving EDI did not differ significantly from children from high-resource families in either the EDI (P = .509) or control (P = .882) groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

A home-based EDI during the first 3 years of life can substantially decrease the developmental gap between children from families with lower versus higher resources, even among children in low- to middle-resource countries.

PMID:
26977079
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-3766
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center