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Mar Environ Res. 2016 Oct;121:64-73. doi: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2016.02.006. Epub 2016 Feb 27.

Consequences of acclimation on the resistance to acute thermal stress: Proteomic focus on mussels from pristine site.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, UMR-I 02 SEBIO, Le Havre University, Normandy University, France. Electronic address: romain.peden@univ-lehavre.fr.
2
Laboratory of Ecotoxicology, UMR-I 02 SEBIO, Le Havre University, Normandy University, France.
3
Platform in Proteomics PISSARO IRIB, Rouen University, Normandy University, France.
4
Platform in Proteomics PISSARO IRIB, Rouen University, Normandy University, France; Laboratory of Neuronal and Neuroendocrine Differenciation and Communication, INSERM U982, Rouen University, Normandy University, France.

Abstract

Climate change constitutes an additional threat for intertidal species that already have to cope with a challenging environment. The present study focuses on the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and aims at investigating the importance of thermal acclimation in heat stress response. Microcosm exposures were performed with mussels submitted to an identical acute thermal stress following two thermal summer acclimations standing for present or future temperature conditions. Gill proteomes were analyzed by 2DE and 96 differentially expressed proteoforms were identified. Our results show that cell integrity appears to be maintained by the rise in molecular protective systems (i.e. Heat Shock Proteins), and by the reallocation of energy production via a switch to anaerobic metabolism and the setting up of alternative energy pathways. Finally, our results indicate that the response of mussels to acute thermal stress is conditioned by the acclimation temperature with an improved response in organisms acclimated to higher temperatures.

KEYWORDS:

2DE; Climate change; Coastal zone; Microcosm; Mytilus edulis; Thermal stress and conditioning

PMID:
26972988
DOI:
10.1016/j.marenvres.2016.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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