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FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2016 Feb;92(2). pii: fiv165. doi: 10.1093/femsec/fiv165. Epub 2015 Dec 20.

Adding mucins to an in vitro batch fermentation model of the large intestine induces changes in microbial population isolated from porcine feces depending on the substrate.

Author information

1
Animal Science Unit, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Passage des Deportes 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium Wallonie-Bruxelles International, place Sainctelette 2, B-1080, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Animal Science Unit, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Passage des Deportes 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium.
3
Animal and Microbial Biology Unit, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Passage des Deportes 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium.
4
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000-Liège, Belgium Fundamental and Applied Research for Animal & Health (FARAH), Food Science Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000-Liège, Belgium.
5
Department of Genetics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000-Liège, Belgium.
6
Fundamental and Applied Research for Animal & Health (FARAH), Food Science Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, 4000-Liège, Belgium.
7
Animal Science Unit, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Passage des Deportes 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium jerome.bindelle@ulg.ac.be.

Abstract

Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine shows that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosal layers to increase their activity. This study investigated whether this dependence on mucus is substrate dependent and to what extent other genera are impacted by the presence of mucus. Inulin and cellulose were fermented in vitro by a fecal inoculum from pig in the presence or not of mucin beads in order to compare fermentation patterns and bacterial communities. Mucins increased final gas production with inulin and shifted short-chain fatty acid molar ratios (P < 0.001). Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. decreased with mucins, but Bacteroides spp. increased when inulin was fermented. A more in-depth community analysis indicated that the mucins increased Proteobacteria (0.55 vs 0.25%, P = 0.013), Verrucomicrobia (5.25 vs 0.03%, P = 0.032), Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae and Akkermansia spp. Proteobacteria (5.67 vs 0.55%, P < 0.001) and Lachnospiraceae (33 vs 10.4%) were promoted in the mucus compared with the broth, while Ruminococcaceae decreased. The introduction of mucins affected many microbial genera and fermentation patterns, but from PCA results, the impact of mucus was independent of the fermentation substrate.

KEYWORDS:

cellulose; in vitro model; intestinal fermentation; inulin; microbiota; mucins

PMID:
26691596
DOI:
10.1093/femsec/fiv165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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