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Sci Rep. 2015 Sep 28;5:14566. doi: 10.1038/srep14566.

Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neuronal Cells Cultured on Chemically-Defined Hydrogels for Sensitive In Vitro Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin.

Author information

1
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
3
MTI-GlobalStem, Inc. Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States of America.
4
Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
5
Morgridge Institute for Research, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
6
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States of America.
7
Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.

Abstract

Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) detection provides a useful model for validating cell-based neurotoxicity screening approaches, as sensitivity is dependent on functionally competent neurons and clear quantitative endpoints are available for correlating results to approved animal testing protocols. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neuronal cells were cultured on chemically-defined poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels formed by "thiol-ene" photopolymerization and tested as a cell-based neurotoxicity assay by determining sensitivity to active BoNT/A1. BoNT/A1 sensitivity was comparable to the approved in vivo mouse bioassay for human iPSC-derived neurons and neural stem cells (iPSC-NSCs) cultured on PEG hydrogels or treated tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces. However, maximum sensitivity for BoNT detection was achieved two weeks earlier for iPSC-NSCs that were differentiated and matured on PEG hydrogels compared to TCP. Therefore, chemically-defined synthetic hydrogels offer benefits over standard platforms when optimizing culture conditions for cell-based screening and achieve sensitivities comparable to an approved animal testing protocol.

PMID:
26411797
PMCID:
PMC4585966
DOI:
10.1038/srep14566
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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