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Diabetes. 2016 Jan;65(1):216-27. doi: 10.2337/db15-0389. Epub 2015 Sep 22.

Angiogenic microRNAs Linked to Incidence and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes.

Author information

1
King's British Heart Foundation Centre of Research Excellence, King's College London, London, U.K.
2
King's British Heart Foundation Centre of Research Excellence, King's College London, London, U.K. Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K. Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
3
Department of Neurology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
4
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.
5
Steno Diabetes Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, U.K. n.chaturvedi@ucl.ac.uk manuel.mayr@kcl.ac.uk.
7
King's British Heart Foundation Centre of Research Excellence, King's College London, London, U.K. n.chaturvedi@ucl.ac.uk manuel.mayr@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as novel biomarkers of diabetes. The current study focuses on the role of circulating miRNAs in patients with type 1 diabetes and their association with diabetic retinopathy. A total of 29 miRNAs were quantified in serum samples (n = 300) using a nested case-control study design in two prospective cohorts of the DIabetic REtinopathy Candesartan Trial (DIRECT): PROTECT-1 and PREVENT-1. The PREVENT-1 trial included patients without retinopathy at baseline; the PROTECT-1 trial included patients with nonproliferative retinopathy at baseline. Two miRNAs previously implicated in angiogenesis, miR-27b and miR-320a, were associated with incidence and with progression of retinopathy: the odds ratio per SD higher miR-27b was 0.57 (95% CI 0.40, 0.82; P = 0.002) in PREVENT-1, 0.78 (0.57, 1.07; P = 0.124) in PROTECT-1, and 0.67 (0.50, 0.92; P = 0.012) combined. The respective odds ratios for higher miR-320a were 1.57 (1.07, 2.31; P = 0.020), 1.43 (1.05, 1.94; P = 0.021), and 1.48 (1.17, 1.88; P = 0.001). Proteomics analyses in endothelial cells returned the antiangiogenic protein thrombospondin-1 as a common target of both miRNAs. Our study identifies two angiogenic miRNAs, miR-320a and miR-27b, as potential biomarkers for diabetic retinopathy.

PMID:
26395742
DOI:
10.2337/db15-0389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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