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Nature. 2015 Sep 17;525(7569):339-44. doi: 10.1038/nature14877. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

Panorama of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes.

Author information

1
Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1, Canada.
2
Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
3
Department of Medical Biophysics, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.
4
Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada.
5
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
6
Department of Biochemistry, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2, Canada.
7
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, 01307 Dresden, Germany.
8
Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.

Abstract

Macromolecular complexes are essential to conserved biological processes, but their prevalence across animals is unclear. By combining extensive biochemical fractionation with quantitative mass spectrometry, here we directly examined the composition of soluble multiprotein complexes among diverse metazoan models. Using an integrative approach, we generated a draft conservation map consisting of more than one million putative high-confidence co-complex interactions for species with fully sequenced genomes that encompasses functional modules present broadly across all extant animals. Clustering reveals a spectrum of conservation, ranging from ancient eukaryotic assemblies that have probably served cellular housekeeping roles for at least one billion years, ancestral complexes that have accrued contemporary components, and rarer metazoan innovations linked to multicellularity. We validated these projections by independent co-fractionation experiments in evolutionarily distant species, affinity purification and functional analyses. The comprehensiveness, centrality and modularity of these reconstructed interactomes reflect their fundamental mechanistic importance and adaptive value to animal cell systems.

PMID:
26344197
PMCID:
PMC5036527
DOI:
10.1038/nature14877
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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