Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Histochem Cytochem. 2015 Nov;63(11):854-65. doi: 10.1369/0022155415600498. Epub 2015 Jul 28.

Human SERPINB12 Is an Abundant Intracellular Serpin Expressed in Most Surface and Glandular Epithelia.

Author information

1
Divisions of Newborn Medicine ,Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (JZN,MG,LEJ,CJL,GAS)
2
Pathology, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (JAO)
3
Cell Biology and Physiology, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (GAS)

Abstract

The intracellular serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are an important family of proteins that protect cells form proteinase-mediated injury. Understanding the tissue and cellular expression pattern of this protein family can provide important insights into their physiologic roles. For example, high expression in epithelial tissues, such as lung, may suggest a biologic function in cellular defense, secretion, or selective absorption. Although the expression pattern of many of the intracellular serpins has been well described, one member of this class, SERPINB12, has not been carefully examined. We generated a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against human SERPINB12 and delineated its specificity and tissue and cell type distribution pattern through immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. This monoclonal antibody was human specific and did not cross-react with other human intracellular serpins or mouse Serpinb12. SERPINB12 was found in nearly all the tissues investigated. In addition, this serpin was found in multiple cell types within individual tissues but primarily the epithelium. These data suggest that SERPINB12, like some other intracellular serpins, may play a vital role in barrier function by providing protection of epithelial cells.

KEYWORDS:

epithelium; human; immunohistochemistry; protease; serpin; tissue array

PMID:
26220980
PMCID:
PMC4812677
DOI:
10.1369/0022155415600498
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center