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Nutr Rev. 2015 Aug;73(8):523-43. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nuv016. Epub 2015 Jun 27.

Nutrigenetics of cholesterol metabolism: observational and dietary intervention studies in the postgenomic era.

Author information

1
M.M.H. Abdullah, P.J.H. Jones, and P.K. Eck are with the Department of Human Nutritional Sciences and the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals (RCFFN), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. P.J.H. Jones is with the Department of Food Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
2
M.M.H. Abdullah, P.J.H. Jones, and P.K. Eck are with the Department of Human Nutritional Sciences and the Richardson Centre for Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals (RCFFN), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. P.J.H. Jones is with the Department of Food Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. eck@cc.umanitoba.ca.

Abstract

Cholesterol metabolism is a well-defined responder to dietary intakes and a classic biomarker of cardiovascular health. For this reason, circulating cholesterol levels have become key in shaping nutritional recommendations by health authorities worldwide for better management of cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of mortality and one of the most costly health problems globally. Data from observational and dietary intervention studies, however, highlight a marked between-individual variability in the response of cholesterol metabolism to similar dietary protocols, a phenomenon linked to genetic heterogeneity. This review summarizes the postgenomic evidence of polymorphisms within cholesterol-associated genes relative to fasting circulating cholesterol levels under diverse nutritional conditions. A number of cholesterol-related gene-diet interactions are confirmed, which may have clinical importance, supporting a deeper look into the rapidly emerging field of nutrigenetics for meaningful conclusions that may eventually lead to genetically targeted dietary recommendations in the era of personalized nutrition.

KEYWORDS:

cardiovascular disease; circulating cholesterol; gene-diet interaction; personalized nutrition; single nucleotide polymorphism

PMID:
26117841
DOI:
10.1093/nutrit/nuv016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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