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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Aug 1;153:78-85. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.06.003. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Positive and negative metacognitions about alcohol use among university students: Psychometric properties of the PAMS and NAMS French versions.

Author information

1
C2S Laboratory (EA 6291), Reims Champagne-Ardenne University, Reims, France; Department of Psychiatry, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France. Electronic address: fabien.gierski@univ-reims.fr.
2
School of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University, London, United Kingdom.
3
Cognitive Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Unit, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
C2S Laboratory (EA 6291), Reims Champagne-Ardenne University, Reims, France; INSERM ERi24 GRAP, Research Group on Alcohol and Drugs, Jules Verne Picardie University, Amiens, France.
5
INSERM ERi24 GRAP, Research Group on Alcohol and Drugs, Jules Verne Picardie University, Amiens, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Metacognitions about the positive and negative effects of alcohol use have been associated with various patterns of drinking. The aim of the present study was to validate French versions of the Positive Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (PAMS) and the Negative Alcohol Metacognitions Scale (NAMS) developed by Spada and Wells (2008, Addict. Behav. 33, 515) and to investigate the relationship between metacognitions and patterns of alcohol use among university students.

METHODS:

Responses of 1600 university students who participated in an internet survey-based study on alcohol use were submitted to confirmatory (N=800, mean age 20.40 years, 45.50% male) and exploratory (N=800, mean age 20.34 years, 45.38% male) factor analyses in two separate samples. Alcohol use, binge drinking and mood were also assessed.

RESULTS:

In line with the original versions of the scales, results provided support for a two-factor structure of the French PAMS and NAMS. Both scales revealed adequate internal reliability. Good temporal stability was found for the two factors of the NAMS, whereas one factor of the PAMS showed weakness across time. Predictive validity revealed that negative alcohol metacognitions about the uncontrollability of alcohol use were found to be consistently associated with alcohol use and binge drinking, whereas positive metacognitions about alcohol use were found to be differentially associated with alcohol use and binge drinking.

CONCLUSIONS:

The French versions of the PAMS and NAMS exhibited suitable psychometric properties. This study also emphasized the role of metacognitions about alcohol use in drinking behaviour among university students.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol use; Binge drinking; Confirmatory factor analysis; Metacognition; Metacognitions about alcohol use; University students

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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