Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Pharmacol. 2015 Sep 15;763(Pt B):136-42. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.06.026. Epub 2015 Jun 17.

In-vivo pharmacology of Trace-Amine Associated Receptor 1.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
2
Department of Neuroscience and Brain Technologies, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova, Italy.
3
Institute of Translational Biomedicine, Saint- Petersburg State University, Saint -Petersburg, Russia.
4
Institute of Translational Biomedicine, Saint- Petersburg State University, Saint -Petersburg, Russia; Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Skolkovo, Moscow Region, Russia.
5
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: ali.salahpour@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

Trace-amines (TAs) are endogenous amines that are implicated in several physiological processes including modulation of aminergic neurotransmission. These compounds exert their effect by activating a class of G protein-coupled receptors termed Trace-Amine Associated Receptors (TAARs), where TAAR1 is the only human receptor that has been shown to bind endogenous TAs. Most of the studies have focused on studying the role of TAAR1 on modulation of the dopamine transmission. These studies indicate that TAAR1 is a negative regulator of dopamine transmission making TAAR1 a novel target for neuropsychiatric disorders that arises from dopamine dysfunction such as schizophrenia. This review discusses the unique pharmacology of TAAR1 with the major focus on the physiological role of TAAR1 and its modulation of dopamine transmission.

KEYWORDS:

Dopamine; Neurological disorders; TAAR1; Trace-amines

PMID:
26093041
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.06.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center