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Cell Metab. 2015 Jul 7;22(1):4-11. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2015.05.011. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Understanding the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Health Benefits.

Author information

1
East Carolina Diabetes and Obesity Institute, Departments of Physiology and Kinesiology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA. Electronic address: neuferp@ecu.edu.
2
UAB Center for Exercise Medicine and Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA.
3
Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27701, USA.
4
Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA.
5
UC Irvine Institute for Clinical and Translational Science and Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.
6
Translational Research Institute for Metabolism and Diabetes, Florida Hospital - Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, Orlando, FL 32804, USA.
7
Departments of Biomedical Sciences, Medical Pharmacology and Physiology, and Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA.
8
Division of Geriatric Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
10
Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.
11
Department of Kinesiology, McGill University Health Center, McGill University, Montreal, QC H2W 1S4, Canada.
12
Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.
13
Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
14
Department of Health and Physical Activity, Physical Activity and Weight Management Research Center, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.
15
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
16
National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
17
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
18
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
19
National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
20
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
21
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
22
Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
23
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
24
Office of Disease Prevention, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

The beneficial effects of physical activity (PA) are well documented, yet the mechanisms by which PA prevents disease and improves health outcomes are poorly understood. To identify major gaps in knowledge and potential strategies for catalyzing progress in the field, the NIH convened a workshop in late October 2014 entitled "Understanding the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Health Benefits." Presentations and discussions emphasized the challenges imposed by the integrative and intermittent nature of PA, the tremendous discovery potential of applying "-omics" technologies to understand interorgan crosstalk and biological networking systems during PA, and the need to establish an infrastructure of clinical trial sites with sufficient expertise to incorporate mechanistic outcome measures into adequately sized human PA trials. Identification of the mechanisms that underlie the link between PA and improved health holds extraordinary promise for discovery of novel therapeutic targets and development of personalized exercise medicine.

PMID:
26073496
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2015.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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