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Dev Cell. 2015 Jun 8;33(5):576-88. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2015.04.024. Epub 2015 May 28.

Organizer-Derived WOX5 Signal Maintains Root Columella Stem Cells through Chromatin-Mediated Repression of CDF4 Expression.

Author information

1
BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, Faculty of Biology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg, Germany.
2
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703HA Wageningen, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Linnean Center for Plant Biology, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
4
BIOSS Centre for Biological Signalling Studies, Faculty of Biology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Schänzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg, Germany. Electronic address: laux@biologie.uni-freiburg.de.

Abstract

Stem cells in plants and animals are maintained pluripotent by signals from adjacent niche cells. In plants, WUSCHEL HOMEOBOX (WOX) transcription factors are central regulators of stem cell maintenance in different meristem types, yet their molecular mode of action has remained elusive. Here we show that in the Arabidopsis root meristem, the WOX5 protein moves from the root niche organizer, the quiescent center, into the columella stem cells, where it directly represses the transcription factor gene CDF4. This creates a gradient of CDF4 transcription, which promotes differentiation opposite to the WOX5 gradient, allowing stem cell daughter cells to exit the stem cell state. We further show that WOX5 represses CDF4 transcription by recruiting TPL/TPR co-repressors and the histone deacetylase HDA19, which consequently induces histone deacetylation at the CDF4 regulatory region. Our results show that chromatin-mediated repression of differentiation programs is a common strategy in plant and animal stem cell niches.

PMID:
26028217
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2015.04.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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