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Autism. 2016 Feb;20(2):233-49. doi: 10.1177/1362361315577218. Epub 2015 Apr 27.

Use of early intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorder across Europe.

Author information

1
King's College London, UK erica.salomone@kcl.ac.uk.
2
Charles University and University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic.
3
Université François Rabelais de Tours, France.
4
Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.
5
Titu Maiorescu University, Romania.
6
Radboud University, The Netherlands.
7
Universidad de Salamanca, Spain.
8
Budapest and Kispest Child Mental Health Institute, Hungary.
9
University of Edinburgh, UK.
10
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
11
Policlinica Gipuzkoa, Spain.
12
Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
13
Rare Diseases Research Institute (IIER) of the National Institute of Health of Spain (IIER-NIH Carlos III), Spain.
14
University of Bucharest, Romania.
15
Booth Hall Children's Hospital, UK.
16
Linköping University, Sweden.
17
State Diagnostic and Counselling Centre, Iceland.
18
Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
19
University of Warsaw, Poland.
20
University of Tampere, Finland.
21
Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Macedonia.
22
Medical University of Graz, Austria.
23
Newcastle University, UK.
24
Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Finland.
25
IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation, Italy.
26
Josefinum, Germany.
27
Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Portugal.
28
University of Heidelberg, Germany.
29
Ghent University, Belgium.
30
Université de Toulouse - Le Mirail, France.
31
LVR-Klinik Bonn, Germany.
32
Instituto Nacional de Saúde Doutor Ricardo Jorge, Portugal.
33
King's College London, UK.

Abstract

Little is known about use of early interventions for autism spectrum disorder in Europe. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder aged 7 years or younger (N = 1680) were recruited through parent organisations in 18 European countries and completed an online survey about the interventions their child received. There was considerable variation in use of interventions, and in some countries more than 20% of children received no intervention at all. The most frequently reported interventions were speech and language therapy (64%) and behavioural, developmental and relationship-based interventions (55%). In some parts of Europe, use of behavioural, developmental and relationship-based interventions was associated with higher parental educational level and time passed since diagnosis, rather than with child characteristics. These findings highlight the need to monitor use of intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder in Europe in order to contrast inequalities.

KEYWORDS:

Europe; autism; intervention; use of early intervention

PMID:
25916866
DOI:
10.1177/1362361315577218
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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