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Neuron. 2015 May 6;86(3):711-25. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.03.046. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

Molecular Remodeling of the Presynaptic Active Zone of Drosophila Photoreceptors via Activity-Dependent Feedback.

Author information

1
Dendrite Differentiation, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn 53175, Germany.
2
Core Division of Advanced Research, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Titech), Yokohama 226-8501, Japan.
3
Gene Network Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics and Department of Genetics, SOKENDAI, Mishima 411-8540, Japan.
4
European Neuroscience Institute (ENI), 37077 Göttingen, Germany.
5
Image and Data Analysis Facility, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn 53175, Germany.
6
Core Division of Advanced Research, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Titech), Yokohama 226-8501, Japan. Electronic address: suzukit@bio.titech.ac.jp.
7
Dendrite Differentiation, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn 53175, Germany. Electronic address: gaia.tavosanis@dzne.de.

Abstract

Neural activity contributes to the regulation of the properties of synapses in sensory systems, allowing for adjustment to a changing environment. Little is known about how synaptic molecular components are regulated to achieve activity-dependent plasticity at central synapses. Here, we found that after prolonged exposure to natural ambient light the presynaptic active zone in Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes reversible remodeling, including loss of Bruchpilot, DLiprin-α, and DRBP, but not of DSyd-1 or Cacophony. The level of depolarization of the postsynaptic neurons is critical for the light-induced changes in active zone composition in the photoreceptors, indicating the existence of a feedback signal. In search of this signal, we have identified a crucial role of microtubule meshwork organization downstream of the divergent canonical Wnt pathway, potentially via Kinesin-3 Imac. These data reveal that active zone composition can be regulated in vivo and identify the underlying molecular machinery.

PMID:
25892303
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.03.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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