Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Science. 2015 Mar 13;347(6227):1265-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1256682.

Time-restricted feeding attenuates age-related cardiac decline in Drosophila.

Author information

1
Regulatory Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA. Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Regulatory Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
3
Departments of Biology and Molecular Biology, and Heart Institutes, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182, USA. gmelkani@mail.sdsu.edu satchin@salk.edu.
4
Regulatory Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA. gmelkani@mail.sdsu.edu satchin@salk.edu.

Abstract

Circadian clocks orchestrate periods of rest or activity and feeding or fasting over the course of a 24-hour day and maintain homeostasis. To assess whether a consolidated 24-hour cycle of feeding and fasting can sustain health, we explored the effect of time-restricted feeding (TRF; food access limited to daytime 12 hours every day) on neural, peripheral, and cardiovascular physiology in Drosophila melanogaster. We detected improved sleep, prevention of body weight gain, and deceleration of cardiac aging under TRF, even when caloric intake and activity were unchanged. We used temporal gene expression profiling and validation through classical genetics to identify the TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) chaperonin, the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, and the circadian clock as pathways mediating the benefits of TRF.

PMID:
25766238
PMCID:
PMC4578815
DOI:
10.1126/science.1256682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center