Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prev Med. 2015 May;74:24-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.01.021. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

Social contextual factors and tobacco use among Indian teachers: insights from the Bihar School Teachers' Study.

Author information

1
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Center for Community Based Research, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 677 Huntington Avenue-7th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: eve_nagler@dfci.harvard.edu.
2
WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia, Indraprastha Estate, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, New Delhi 110002, India.
3
Healis Sekhsaria Institute For Public Health, 501, Technocity, Plot-X-4/5, TTC Industrial Area, Mahape, Navi Mumbai, Pin code-400701, Maharashtra, India.
4
New England Research Institutes, 480 Pleasant Street, Watertown, MA 02472, USA.
5
University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, 1300S. 2nd Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA.
6
Freelance Behavioral Scientist, New Delhi 110016, India.
7
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Center for Community Based Research, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
8
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Center for Community Based Research, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 677 Huntington Avenue-7th Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Tobacco use within India has significant effects on the global burden of tobacco-related disease. As role models and opinion leaders, teachers are at the forefront of tobacco control efforts, yet little is known about their own tobacco use. This study examines the association between factors in the social environment and tobacco use among teachers in Bihar, India.

METHODS:

The study was based on the Bihar School Teachers' Study baseline survey. Seventy-two Bihar government schools (grades 8-10) were randomly selected for the study and all school personnel were invited to complete the survey in June/July in 2009 and 2010. We assessed the relation between social contextual factors and current smoking/smokeless tobacco use by fitting a series of logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

After controlling for clustering of teachers in schools and other covariates, our results showed teachers with one or more coworkers who used tobacco were twice as likely to be smokeless tobacco users as teachers with no co-workers who used tobacco. Teachers who reported rules prohibiting smoking at home were significantly less likely to smoke than teachers without such rules. Older male teachers also had significantly greater odds of smoking/using smokeless tobacco.

CONCLUSION:

These findings provide direction for future interventions targeting the social context.

KEYWORDS:

Co-workers; Family influence; India; Schools; Social context; Teachers; Tobacco use

PMID:
25657167
PMCID:
PMC4617324
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.01.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center