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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2015 Feb 3;9(2):e0003479. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003479. eCollection 2015 Feb.

Describing the breakbone fever: IDODEN, an ontology for dengue fever.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH, Heraklion, Greece; Department of Biology, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
2
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH, Heraklion, Greece.
3
Centre of Functional Genomics, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
4
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, FORTH, Heraklion, Greece; Department of Biology, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece; Centre of Functional Genomics, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ontologies represent powerful tools in information technology because they enhance interoperability and facilitate, among other things, the construction of optimized search engines. To address the need to expand the toolbox available for the control and prevention of vector-borne diseases we embarked on the construction of specific ontologies. We present here IDODEN, an ontology that describes dengue fever, one of the globally most important diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

We constructed IDODEN using open source software, and modeled it on IDOMAL, the malaria ontology developed previously. IDODEN covers all aspects of dengue fever, such as disease biology, epidemiology and clinical features. Moreover, it covers all facets of dengue entomology. IDODEN, which is freely available, can now be used for the annotation of dengue-related data and, in addition to its use for modeling, it can be utilized for the construction of other dedicated IT tools such as decision support systems.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

The availability of the dengue ontology will enable databases hosting dengue-associated data and decision-support systems for that disease to perform most efficiently and to link their own data to those stored in other independent repositories, in an architecture- and software-independent manner.

PMID:
25646954
PMCID:
PMC4315569
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003479
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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