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Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Nov;17(11):1385-92. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntv011. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

Positive Psychotherapy for Smoking Cessation: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

  • 1Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI; christopher_kahler@brown.edu.
  • 2Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI;
  • 3Department of Psychology, Hiram College, Hiram, OH;
  • 4Departments of Preventive Medicine and Psychology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA;
  • 5School of Nursing, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Greater depressive symptoms and low positive affect (PA) are associated with poor smoking cessation outcomes. Smoking cessation approaches that incorporate a focus on PA may benefit smokers trying to quit. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot randomized clinical trial to compare standard smoking cessation treatment (ST) with smoking cessation treatment that targets positive affect, termed positive psychotherapy for smoking cessation (PPT-S).

METHOD:

Smokers who were seeking smoking cessation treatment were assigned by urn randomization to receive, along with 8 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy, either ST (n = 31) or PPT-S (n = 35). Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence was biochemically confirmed at 8, 16, and 26 weeks.

RESULTS:

Compared to ST, a greater percentage of participants in PPT-S were abstinent at 8 weeks, 16 weeks, and 26 weeks, but these differences were nonsignificant. In a more statistically powerful longitudinal model, participants in PPT-S had a significantly higher odds of abstinence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.02, 7.42; p = .046) across follow-ups compared to those in ST. The positive effect of PPT-S was stronger for those higher in PA (OR = 6.69, 95% CI = 1.16, 38.47, p = .03). Greater use of PPT-S strategies during the initial 8 weeks of quitting was associated with a less steep decline in smoking abstinence rates over time (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.06, 6.56, p =.04).

CONCLUSION:

This trial suggests substantial promise for incorporating PPT into smoking cessation treatment.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01451814.

PMID:
25646352
PMCID:
PMC4612345
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/ntv011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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