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Sci Rep. 2015 Jan 8;5:7675. doi: 10.1038/srep07675.

Small tRNA-derived RNAs are increased and more abundant than microRNAs in chronic hepatitis B and C.

Author information

1
1] Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [2] Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [3] Departments of Medicine and Microbiology &Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [4] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
2
1] Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [2] Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan.
4
1] Departments of Medicine and Microbiology &Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [2] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
5
Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
6
Department of Virology and Immunology, Texas Biomedical Research Institute and Southwest National Primate Research Center, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America.
7
1] Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [2] Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America [3] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

Abstract

Persistent infections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) account for the majority of cases of hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. Small, non-coding RNAs play important roles in virus-host interactions. We used high throughput sequencing to conduct an unbiased profiling of small (14-40 nts) RNAs in liver from Japanese subjects with advanced hepatitis B or C and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Small RNAs derived from tRNAs, specifically 30-35 nucleotide-long 5' tRNA-halves (5' tRHs), were abundant in non-malignant liver and significantly increased in humans and chimpanzees with chronic viral hepatitis. 5' tRH abundance exceeded microRNA abundance in most infected non-cancerous tissues. In contrast, in matched cancer tissue, 5' tRH abundance was reduced, and relative abundance of individual 5' tRHs was altered. In hepatitis B-associated HCC, 5' tRH abundance correlated with expression of the tRNA-cleaving ribonuclease, angiogenin. These results demonstrate that tRHs are the most abundant small RNAs in chronically infected liver and that their abundance is altered in liver cancer.

PMID:
25567797
PMCID:
PMC4286764
DOI:
10.1038/srep07675
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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