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J Hosp Infect. 2014 Dec;88(4):226-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2014.09.006. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

Cross-colonization of infants with probiotic organisms in a neonatal unit.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatal Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; School of Medicine & Medical Science, University College Dublin, Ireland; Neonatal Services, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: leah.hickey@rch.org.au.
2
The Women's Centre for Infectious Diseases, The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Microbiology, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Infection and Immunity Group, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
3
Neonatal Services, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Infection and Immunity Group, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Neonatal Research Group, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
4
School of Medicine & Medical Science, University College Dublin, Ireland; The National Maternity Hospital, Holles Street, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

This study aimed to assess probiotic cross-colonization between infants in a neonatal unit where probiotics were being administered to preterm infants during a clinical trial. We tested stool samples from all infants present in the unit at two time points; the first was during the trial and the second was after trial completion. Samples from 43 infants were tested during the trial; all five infants receiving probiotics and three of 38 not receiving probiotics were colonized. Only one of 44 infants tested after the trial was colonized. The rate of cross-colonization was lower than in previous probiotic studies.

KEYWORDS:

Cross-colonization; Neonatal unit; Preterm infants; Probiotics

PMID:
25447201
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2014.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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