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Immunity. 2014 Oct 16;41(4):657-69. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.09.012.

A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen-presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
2
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
3
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: unanue@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however, the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen-presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103(+) dendritic cell (DC) population. By 4 weeks of age, CD4(+) T cells entered islets coincident with an increase in CD103(+) DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103(+) DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103(+) DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103(+) DCs are essential for autoimmune diabetes development.

PMID:
25367577
PMCID:
PMC4220295
DOI:
10.1016/j.immuni.2014.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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