Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Dermatol. 2015 Feb;151(2):161-9. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.2094.

Effect of psoriasis severity on hypertension control: a population-based study in the United Kingdom.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia2Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
2
Division of Internal Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Section of Inflammation and Cardiometabolic Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
4
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia5Division of Cardiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
5
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Hypertension is prevalent among patients with psoriasis. The effect of psoriasis and its severity on hypertension control is unknown.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the association between uncontrolled blood pressure and psoriasis, both overall and according to objectively measured psoriasis severity, among patients with diagnosed hypertension.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Population-based cross-sectional study nested in a prospective cohort drawn from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), an electronic medical records database broadly representative of the general population in the United Kingdom. The study population included a random sample of patients with psoriasis (n = 1322) between the ages of 25 and 64 years in THIN who were included in the Incident Health Outcomes and Psoriasis Events prospective cohort and their age- and practice-matched controls without psoriasis (n = 11,977). All included patients had a diagnosis of hypertension; their psoriasis diagnosis was confirmed and disease severity was classified by their general practitioners.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher based on the blood pressure recorded closest in time to the assessment of psoriasis severity.

RESULTS:

There was a significant positive dose-response relationship between uncontrolled hypertension and psoriasis severity as objectively determined by the affected body surface area in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses that controlled for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and alcohol use status, presence of comorbid conditions, and current use of antihypertensive medications and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.97; 95% CI, 0.82-1.14 for mild psoriasis; aOR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.99-1.45 for moderate psoriasis; and aOR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.08-2.04 for severe psoriasis; P = .01 for trend). The likelihood of uncontrolled hypertension among psoriasis overall was also increased, although not statistically significantly so (aOR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.98-1.24).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Among patients with hypertension, psoriasis was associated with a greater likelihood of uncontrolled hypertension in a dose-dependent manner, with the greatest likelihood observed among those with moderate to severe psoriasis defined by 3% or more of the body surface area affected. Our data suggest a need for more effective blood pressure management, particularly among patients with more severe psoriasis.

PMID:
25322196
PMCID:
PMC4728300
DOI:
10.1001/jamadermatol.2014.2094
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center