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Neuron. 2014 Oct 1;84(1):107-122. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.012.

Experience-dependent remodeling of basket cell networks in the dentate gyrus.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; The Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; The Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; The Kellogg School of Science and Technology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
3
Regulatory Biology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
4
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, WA 98103, USA.
5
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; The Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: amaximov@scripps.edu.

Abstract

The structural organization of neural circuits is strongly influenced by experience, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. We found that, in the developing dentate gyrus (DG), excitatory drive promotes the somatic innervation of principal granule cells (GCs) by parvalbumin (PV)-positive basket cells. In contrast, presynaptic differentiation of GCs and interneuron subtypes that inhibit GC dendrites is largely resistant to loss of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The networks of PV basket cells in the DG are regulated by vesicular release from projection entorhinal cortical neurons and, at least in part, by NMDA receptors in interneurons. Finally, we present evidence that glutamatergic inputs and NMDA receptors regulate these networks through a presynaptic mechanism that appears to control the branching of interneuron axons. Our results provide insights into how cortical activity tunes the inhibition in a subcortical circuit and reveal new principles of interneuron plasticity.

PMID:
25277456
PMCID:
PMC4197970
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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