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Br J Nutr. 2014 Nov 14;112(9):1447-58. doi: 10.1017/S0007114514002396. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

Finger millet bran supplementation alleviates obesity-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and gut microbial derangements in high-fat diet-fed mice.

Author information

1
National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute (NABI),C-127, Industrial Area, Phase 8, SAS Nagar,160 071,Punjab,India.
2
National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research (NIPER),SAS Nagar,Punjab,India.
3
Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University,Vellore,Tamil Nadu,India.
4
Department of Millets,Tamil Nadu Agricultural University,Coimbatore,Tamil Nadu,India.
5
Department of Biotechnology,Indian Institute of Technology Madras,Chennai,Tamil Nadu,India.
6
Department of Biochemistry,Panjab University,Chandigarh,India.

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies have shown that the consumption of finger millet (FM) alleviates diabetes-related complications. In the present study, the effect of finger millet whole grain (FM-WG) and bran (FM-BR) supplementation was evaluated in high-fat diet-fed LACA mice for 12 weeks. Mice were divided into four groups: control group fed a normal diet (10 % fat as energy); a group fed a high-fat diet; a group fed the same high-fat diet supplemented with FM-BR; a group fed the same high-fat diet supplemented with FM-WG. The inclusion of FM-BR at 10 % (w/w) in a high-fat diet had more beneficial effects than that of FM-WG. FM-BR supplementation prevented body weight gain, improved lipid profile and anti-inflammatory status, alleviated oxidative stress, regulated the expression levels of several obesity-related genes, increased the abundance of beneficial gut bacteria (Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria and Roseburia) and suppressed the abundance of Enterobacter in caecal contents (P≤ 0·05). In conclusion, FM-BR supplementation could be an effective strategy for preventing high-fat diet-induced changes and developing FM-BR-enriched functional foods.

PMID:
25234097
DOI:
10.1017/S0007114514002396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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