Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Nov;168(11):1023-9. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1208.

Limited impact on health and access to care for 19- to 25-year-olds following the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle2Surgical Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle3Centers for Comparative Health Systems Effectiveness Alliance, University of Washington, Seattle.
2
James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio5Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Centers for Comparative Health Systems Effectiveness Alliance, University of Washington, Seattle6Department of Health Services, University of Washington, Seattle.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) allowed young adults to remain on their parents' insurance until 26 years of age. Reports indicate that this has expanded health coverage.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate coverage, access to care, and health care use among 19- to 25-year-olds compared with 26- to 34-year-olds following PPACA implementation.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Data from the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System and the National Health Interview Survey, which provide nationally representative measures of coverage, access to care, and health care use, were used to conduct the study among participants aged 19 to 25 years (young adults) and 26 to 34 years (adults) in 2009 and 2012.

EXPOSURE:

Self-reported health insurance coverage.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

Health status, presence of a usual source of care, and ability to afford medications, dental care, or physician visits.

RESULTS:

Health coverage increased between 2009 and 2012 for 19- to 25-year-olds (68.3% to 71.7%). Using a difference-in-differences (DID) approach, after adjustment, the likelihood of having a usual source of care decreased in both groups but more significantly for 26- to 34-year-olds (DID, 2.8%; 95% CI, 0.45 to 5.15). There was no significant change in health status for 19- to 25-year-olds compared with 26- to 34-year-olds (DID, -0.5%; 95% CI, -1.87 to 0.87). There was no significant change for 19- to 25-year-olds compared with 26- to 34-year-olds in the percentage who reported receiving a routine checkup in the past year (DID, 0.3%; 95% CI, -2.25 to 2.85) or in the ability to afford prescription medications (DID, -0.4%; 95% CI, -2.93 to 1.93), dental care (DID, -2.6%; 95% CI, -5.61 to 0.61), or physician visits (DID, -1.7%; 95% CI, -3.66 to 0.26). There was also no change in the percentage who reported receiving a flu shot (DID, 1.9; 95% CI, -1.93 to 4.93). Insured individuals were more likely to report having a usual source of care and a recent routine checkup and were more likely to be able to afford health care than uninsured individuals.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Implementation of the PPACA was associated with increased health insurance coverage for 19- to 25-year-olds without significant changes in perceived health care affordability or health status. Although the likelihood of having a usual source of care declined between 2009 and 2012 for all, this decrease was smaller among 19- to 25-year-olds, and younger adults were more likely than 26- to 34-year-olds to have a usual source of care.

PMID:
25200181
PMCID:
PMC4218866
DOI:
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center