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Mult Scler. 2015 Feb;21(2):180-8. doi: 10.1177/1352458514541976. Epub 2014 Jul 28.

Progression rates and sample size estimates for PPMS based on the CLIMB study population.

Author information

1
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA.
2
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA/Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA.
3
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, USA tchitnis@partners.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The clinical trial design for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) requires understanding of disability progression in modern patient cohorts.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this paper is to characterize demographic and clinical characteristics of PPMS and assess rate of disability progression.

METHODS:

We studied PPMS (n = 73) and relapsing-onset MS (ROMS) patients (n = 1541) enrolled in CLIMB, a longitudinal study of MS patients at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA). Disability progression for each group was compared using interval-censored survival analysis and time to six-month sustained progression.

RESULTS:

The PP group had a 1.09:1 male:female ratio compared to 1:2.89 for the RO group and greater mean age of onset (PP: 44.4±9.6; RO: 32.7±9.9; p < 0.0001). Motor symptoms at onset and first symptoms localized to spinal cord were each strongly associated with PPMS (p < 0.001). Median time from onset to EDSS 6.0 was faster in PPMS (p < 0.001). PPMS patients progressed faster to EDSS 3 (p < 0.001) and from EDSS 3 to 6 (p < 0.001). Median time to sustained progression in the PP group was 4.85 years (95% CI 2.83-8.35), significantly faster than the RO group (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our modern PPMS cohort is demographically similar to previously studied cohorts. PPMS is associated with faster disability accrual than ROMS. Current real-world observations of time to sustained progression will inform design of new clinical trials for PPMS.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; primary progressive multiple sclerosis

PMID:
25070676
DOI:
10.1177/1352458514541976
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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