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Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(3):268-73. doi: 10.3109/09638288.2014.914585. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

New rehabilitation models for neurologic inpatients in Brazil.

Author information

1
Instituto de Reabilitação Lucy Montoro (IRLM) , São Paulo , Brasil and.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the effects of a rehabilitation program in a neurological inpatient unit in terms of independence for activities of daily living and return to work.

METHOD:

Retrospective study with 148 adults with stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury, and Guillain-Barré syndrome admitted as rehabilitation inpatients within a 1-year period for hospitalization at the Instituto de Reabilitação Lucy Montoro, Brazil. According to their diagnostic groups, subjects undergone semi-standardized models of intensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation for 4-6 weeks.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES:

Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Modified Rankin scale (Rankin), and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS Subjects were evaluated at admission, discharge, and 6 months after discharge.

RESULTS:

Improvement in motor FIM™, Rankin and GOS was observed in all groups. Cognitive FIM increase was less evident in TBI patients. After 6 months, 37.6% of patients were unemployed, 34% underwent outpatient rehabilitation, and 65.2% maintained gains.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first report on the effects from an inpatients rehabilitation model in Brazil. After a short intensive rehabilitation, there were motor and cognitive gains in all groups. Heterogeneity in functional gains suggests more individualized programs may be indicated. Controlled studies are required with larger samples to compare inpatient and outpatient programs.

KEYWORDS:

Brain injuries; Guillain–Barre Syndrome; evaluation of the efficacy-effectiveness of interventions; inpatient care units; length of stay; outcome assessment; spinal cord injury; stroke

PMID:
24773116
PMCID:
PMC4364258
DOI:
10.3109/09638288.2014.914585
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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